Instructions for Publication

  1. The Iraqi national journal of nursing specialties publishes original research and articles in different scientific fields of nursing.
  2. All the submitted manuscripts will be examined thoroughly by a specialized panel of local and international experts for their scientific contents, aiming for assuring high-quality publication standard.
  3. A written request should be submitted to the editor in chief, which includes the title(s) Arabic and English of the manuscript(s) name(s) of author(s), and their scientific rank(s), if the manuscript(s) are extracted from dissertation or thesis should specified.
  4. The manuscript should be submitted in either Arabic or English language with abstracts in both languages. Each abstract should not exceed (150-200) word.
  5. The manuscript should be submitted in four typed copies including the original ones on paper size (A4). A margin of (2.5) cm width should be left on both sides of the page. The manuscript should not exceed (10) pages including tables and figures.
  6. The manuscript should be printed using Microsoft word program with letter type of Arabic Transparent, letter size (12) for the text, tables, figures and references. The letter size for the title is (16), (14) for the author(s)' name(s) and (10) for the abstract and the keywords and space between lines one cm.
  7. Name(s) of author(s), scientific rank(s), affiliation, and title of manuscript should be written on a separate page in both languages.
  8. Accepted manuscripts for publication should be re-submitted after making all the recommended modifications as one hard copy as well as a soft copy on compact disc.
  9. The manuscript should be organized according to the following:
  10. An abstract in the other language and in the following style (objectives, methodology,    results, and recommendations).
  11. An abstract in the manuscript language and in the following style (objectives, methodology, results, and recommendations).
  12. Keywords (should follow the abstract which include (3-7) key words, related to the title of the manuscript in a bold font.
  13. Numbering of tables and figures should be presented on sequential order and provided with titles on the top and interpretations on the bottom. Each one of them should be referred to with the number in the text. These tables and figures should be printed in separate pages.
  14. All tables with abbreviations should be enriched with footnotes.
  15. References should be presented through the use of Vancouver style and according to the priority in the text. Their total number should not exceed (20) ones. Moreover, it is highly recommended to cite the most recent literature that was published during the past seven years. They should be listed at the end as follows:
  16. Citing references in the body of your text

Each piece of work which is cited in your text should have a unique number, assigned in the order of citation. If, in your text, you cite a piece of work more than once, the same citation number should be used. Write the number as superscript.

14.1 Citing one piece of work

Recent research1 indicates that the number of duplicate papers being published is increasing.

14.2 Citing more than one piece of work at the same time

If you want to cite several pieces of work in the same sentence, you will need to include the citation number for each piece of work. A hyphen should be used to link numbers which are inclusive, and a comma used where numbers are not consecutive.

The following is an example where works 6, 7, 8, 9,13 and 15 have been cited in the same place in the text.

Several studies 6-9, 13, 15 have examined the effect of congestion charging in urban areas.

14.3 Citing a direct quotation

If a direct quote from a book, article etc., is used you must:

  • Use single quotation marks (double quotation marks are usually used for quoting direct speech); and,
  • State the page number.

It has been emphasized 2 (p 1) that carers of diabetes sufferers 'require perseverance and an understanding of humanity'.

Duplication of charts, diagrams, pictures etc., should be treated as direct quotes and cited as described above.

14.4 Citing the author's name in your text

You can use the author's name in your text, but you must insert the citation number as well.

As emphasized by Watkins 2 (p 1) carers of diabetes sufferers 'require perseverance and an understanding of humanity'.

14.5 Citing more than one author's name in your text

If there is more than one author use 'et al' after the first author.

Simons et al 3 (p 4) state that the principle of effective stress is 'imperfectly known and understood by many practicing engineers'.

14.6 Citing from works with no obvious author

If you need to cite a piece of work which does not have an obvious author, you should use what is called a 'corporate' author. For example, many online works will not have individually named authors, and in many cases the author will be an organization or company.

The Department of Health5 recently estimated the number of dementia sufferers in the UK at 570 000 or the number of dementia sufferers in the UK has been recently estimated at 570 0005.

14.7 Citing the author of multi-media works

CD-ROMs (including electronic books on CD-ROM): if there is not an obvious author use the title of the CD-ROM as the author.

DVD/Video: the series title should be used as the author.

14.8 Tips on good quotation practice

Quotations longer than two lines should be inserted as a separate, indented paragraph.

Smith 4 (p 11) summarizes the importance of mathematics to society and the knowledge economy, stating that:

'Mathematics provides a powerful universal language and intellectual toolkit for abstraction, generalization and synthesis. It is the language of science and technology. It enables us to probe the natural universe and to develop new technologies that have helped us control and master our environment, and change societal expectations and standards of living.'

or

A recent UK report 4 summarized the importance of mathematics to society and the knowledge economy, stating that:

'Mathematics provides a powerful universal language and intellectual toolkit for abstraction, generalization and synthesis. It is the language of science and technology. It enables us to probe the natural universe and to develop new technologies that have helped us control and master our environment, and change societal expectations and standards of living.'

If you want to insert a long quotation (over two lines) but do not to want include all of the text, you can remove the unnecessary text and replace with ' . . . ' .

As summarized by Smith 4 (p 11):

'Mathematics provides a powerful universal language and intellectual toolkit for abstraction, generalization and synthesis . . . It enables us to probe the natural universe and to develop new technologies that have helped us control and master our environment, and change societal expectations and standards of living.'

You should only do this when you use a quotation taken from one paragraph.

When you use quotations within your text, sometimes you may want to insert one or two words in the quotation so that your complete sentence is grammatically correct. To indicate that you have inserted words into a quotation, these have to be enclosed in square brackets.

Smith 4 (p 11) provides a number of reasons as to why mathematics is important, stating that it is 'a powerful universal language and intellectual toolkit for abstraction, generalization and synthesis . . . [and] enables us to probe the natural universe and to develop new technologies that have helped us control and master our environment, and change societal expectations and standards of living.'

N.B. Writing skills: at your academic level you will be expected to develop your writing skills, and this includes being able to discuss and demonstrate an understanding of other people's work and ideas in your own words. This is called

paraphrasing. It is much better to paraphrase than to use many quotations when you write.

14.9. How to write a reference list

This is a list of all the sources that have been cited in the assignment. You should write one inclusive list showing books, journals etc., not separate lists according to source type.

  • The list should be in numerical order with each number matching and referring to the one in the text;
  • The list should be at the end of your work; and,
  • Books, paper or electronic journal articles, etc., are written in a particular format that must be followed.

14.10. Example of a reference list

  1. Arrami M, Garner H. A tale of two citations. Nature 2008;451(7177):397-9.
  2. Watkins PJ. ABC of Diabetes. 5th ed. London: Blackwell Publishing; 2003.
  3. Simons NE, Menzies B, Matthews M. A Short Course in Soil and Rock Slope Engineering. London: Thomas Telford Publishing; 2001.
  4. Smith A. Making mathematics count: the report of Professor Adrian Smith's inquiry into post-14 mathematics education. London: The Stationery Office; 2004.
  5. Department of Health. More help for people with dementia.

http://nds.coi.gov.uk/content/detail.asp?NewsArealD=2&ReleaselD=371217 (accessed 20 Jun 2008).

14.11. Bibliography

There may be items which you have consulted for your work, but not cited. These can be listed at the end of your manuscript in a 'bibliography'. These items should be listed in alphabetical order by author and laid out in the same way as items in your reference list. If you can cite from every work you consulted, you will only need a reference list. If you wish to show to your reader (examiner) the unused research you carried out, the bibliography will show your extra effort. You will not need to number each work listed in your bibliography.

Always check the guidance you are given for coursework, dissertations, etc., to find out if you are expected to submit work with a reference list and a bibliography. If in doubt, ask your lecturer or supervisor.

How to write references for your reference list and bibliography

  1. Books: print

Author/Editor (if it is an editor/editors always put (ed./eds.) after the name)

Title (this should be in italics)

Series title and number (if part of a series)

Edition (if not the first edition)

Place of publication (if there is more than one place listed, use the first named)

Publisher

Year of publication

Simons NE, Menzies B, Matthews M. A Short Course in Soil and Rock Slope Engineering. London: Thomas Telford Publishing; 2001.

  1. Books: electronic

Author/Editor (if an editor/editors always put (ed./eds.) after the name)

Title (this should be in italics)

Series title and number (if part of a series)

Edition (if not the first edition)

Place of publication (if there is more than one place listed, use the first named)

Publisher

Year of publication

URL

Date of access

Simons NE, Menzies B, Matthews M. A Short Course in Soil and Rock Slope Engineering. London: Thomas Telford Publishing; 2001. www.myilibrary.com?ID=93941 (accessed 18 Jun 2008).

  1. Books: chapter in an edited book

Author of the chapter

Title of chapter followed by, In:

Editor (always put (ed./eds) after the name)

Title of book (this should be in italics)

Series title and number (if part of a series)

Edition (if not the first edition)

Place of publication (if there is more than one place listed, use the first named)

Publisher

Year of publication

Page numbers (use 'p' before the page numbers. Elide the page numbers)

Moran MJ. Engineering thermodynamics. In: Kreith F, Goswami DY (eds.) The CRC handbook of mechanical engineering. 2nd ed. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 2005. p75 - 81.

  1. Books: translated

Author/Editor (if an editor/editors always put (ed./eds.) after the name)

Title (this should be in italics)

Trans followed by the name of the translator

Series title and number (if part of a series)

Edition (if not the first edition)

Place of publication (if there is more than one place listed, use the first named)

Publisher

Year of publication

Aristotle. Physics. Trans Graham DW. Oxford: Clarendon; 1999.

  1. Books: in a foreign language

Author/Editor (if an editor/editors always put (ed./eds.) after the name)

Title (this should be in italics)

[Title in original language] (this should be in italics)

Series title and number (if part of a series)

Edition (if not the first edition)

Place of publication (if there is more than one place listed, use the first named)

Publisher

Year of publication

García Sánchez JJ. Toponymical atlas of Spain. [Atlas toponímico de España] Madrid: Arco/Libros; 2007.

  1. Journal articles: print

Author

Title of journal article

Title of journal (this should be in italics)

Year of publication

Volume number

(Issue number)

Page numbers of the article

Chibber PK, Majumdar SK. Foreign ownership and profitability: Property rights, control, and the performance of firms in Indian industry. Journal of Law & Economics 1999;42(1): 209-238.

  1. Journal articles: electronic

If an electronic journal article has a DOl (digital object identifier), you can use this instead of the URL. The DOl is a permanent identifier provided by publishers so that the article can always be found online.

Author

Title of journal article

Title of journal (this should be in italics)

Year of publication

Volume number

(Issue number)

Page numbers of the article

URL or DOl

Date of access

Arrami M, Garner H. A tale of two citations. Nature 2008;451(7177): 397-9.

www.nature.com/nature/journal/v451/n7177/full/451397a.html (accessed 20 January 2008).

or

Wang F, Maidment G, Missenden J, Tozer R. The novel use of phase change materials in refrigeration plant. Part 1:

Experimental investigation. Applied Thermal Engineering. 2007;27(17-18): 2893-2901.

doi:10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2005.06.011. (accessed 14 July 2008).

  1. Conference proceedings: whole

Editor/Organisation (if an editor/editors always put (ed./eds.) after the name)

Title (this should be in italics)

Place of publication

Publisher

Year of publication

Edge BL. Coastal engineering 2000: conference proceedings, July 16-21, 2000, Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre,Sydney, Australia. Reston, VA: ASCE; 2001.

  1. Conference proceedings: individual paper

Author

Title of conference paper followed by, In:

Editor/Organisation (if an editor/editors always put (ed./eds.) after the name)

Title (this should be in italics)

Place of publication

Publisher

Year of publication

Page numbers

Wittke M. Design, construction, supervision and long-term behaviour of tunnels in swelling rock. In: Van Cotthem A, Charlier R, Thimus JF, Tshibangu JP. (eds.) Eurock2006: multiphysics coupling and long term behaviour in rock mechanics: proceedings of the International Symposium of the International Society for Rock Mechanics, EUROCK2006, 9-12 May 2006, Liège, Belgium. London: Taylor & Francis; 2006.

  1. Theses

(Final written work by PhD and postgraduate students, dissertations, project reports, discourses and essays by any student.)

Author

Title (this should be in italics)

Type of thesis

Academic institution

Year of publication

Leckenby RJ. Dynamic characterisation and fluid flow modelling of fractured reservoirs. PhD thesis. Imperial College London; 2005.

  1. White and Green papers

(Government consultation papers to inform the debate on new policy and laws.)

Government department

Title (this should be in italics)

Paper number

Place of publication

Publisher

Year of publication

Department of Health. Choosing Health: making healthier choices easier, CM6374. London: Stationery Office; 2001.

  1. Statutory Instruments

(Documents detailing the rules written by the civil service under powers delegated from parliament.)

Title (this should be in italics)

The abbreviation: SI

Statutory Instrument number

Place of publication

Publisher

Year of publication

The Public Contract Regulations 2006. SI 2006/5. London: TSO; 2006.

  1. Standards

Name of Standard Body/Institution

Standard number

Title (this should be in italics)

Place of publication

Publisher

Year of publication

British Standards Institution. BS 5950-8:2003. Structural use of steelwork in building: code of practice for fire resistant design. London: BSI; 2003.

  1. Reports

Author/Editor (if it is an editor/editors always put (ed./eds.) after the name)

Title (this should be in italics)

Organisation

Report number: (this should be followed by the actual number in figures)

Year of publication

Leatherwood S. Whales, dolphins, and porpoises of the western North Atlantic. U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Report number: 63, 2001.

  1. Maps

Author (usually the organisation responsible for publishing the map)

Title (this should be in italics)

Scale

Place of publication (if there is more than one place listed, use the first named)

Publisher

Year of publication

British Geological Survey. South London, 270. 1: 50 000. London: BGS; 1998.

  1. Web pages and websites

Author/Editor

Title (this should be in italics)

URL

date of access

European Space Agency. ESA: Missions, Earth Observation: ENVISAT. http://envisat.esa.int/ (accessed 3 July 2008).

  1. Blogs

Author

Title of blog post

Title (this should be in italics)

Weblog

URL

date of access

Tyler R. The Mechanical interface of the Tardis. Weblog. http:// www .darlikcity .org /publication 3.html (accessed 19 Apr 2006).

  1. Multi-media formats

With the following types of work, you would usually use the title of the TV programme or video recording, or title of the film

(whether on DVD or video) as the author. If the title is used as the author, this should be written in italics: see the DVD example

below. You should also include the type of format in the reference, such as Video: VHS, DVD, Audio cassette, CD-ROM and so on.

Video recordings: from the TV

World in Action. All work and no play. [Video:VHS] London: ITV; 21 Jan 2002.

Video recordings: commercial

Fragile Earth, 5. South American Wetland-.Pantanal. [Video:VHS] Henley: Watchword Video; 1998.

DVDs

Life on Campus. [DVD] London: Imperial College London; 2006.

Audio cassettes

British Diabetic Association. Guidelines on Nutrition. [Audio cassette] London: BDA; 2005.

CD-ROMs

Author/Editor (use the corporate author if no individual author or editor is named)

CD-ROM title (this should be in italics)

[CD-ROM]

Place of publication

Publisher

Year of publication

Encyclopaedia Britannica. Britannica 2003. [CD-ROM] Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica; 2003

  1. Pleases consider that the hard copies of the rejected manuscripts will not be returned to the authors.
  2. For local authors, the total publication fee is 100.000 Iraqi Dinar.
  3. For international authors, the total publication fee is 100 USA Dollar.
  4. In the submitted manuscript, it is highly recommended to cite at least 3 related articles, which were previously published in the Iraqi National Journal of Nursing Specialties.
  5. All the submitted articles will be examined by using “Turnitin”, to check text originality index. It should not exceed 15%; however, direct quotes should not exceed 2%.
  6. In accordance with applied legislations, the methodology section should include a sub-section that focuses on presenting the ethical consideration of the conducted research.
  7. The corresponding author should be highlighted in the final version of the submitted manuscript by putting * .
  8. Arabic numeral “1,2,3,…” should be used in every section that requires using them.
  9. All the funding parties should be declared by the authors in final section of the submitted manuscript.